History and images have been compiled from various sources including, among others, the 1987 National Register of Historic Places, Stack & Beasley's 1902 Sketches of Monroe and Union County, Union County Public Library (Patricia Poland, Genealogy & Local History Librarian), the Heritage Room Photo Collection, North Carolina Map Collection, Rootsweb - An Ancestry.com Community and Ancestry.com family histories.

"Maj." David Anderson Covington - Early Pioneer

David Anderson Covington (1807-1870) was born in Rockingham, Richmond County, NC, the son of Benjamin Coulter Covington (1775-1850) and Nancy Coulter (1779-1812). B.C. Covington was the son of John Covington (1735-1809). The first of this line to come to America was Nehemiah Covington (1628-1681) born in Coventry, England and died in Somerset County, Maryland.
A post in the Charlotte Journal April 6, 1843 - Organization of Union County mentions D.A. Covington as Clerk of Superior Court:
1840 in Anson County
We have been absent two days this week for the purpose of attending the organization of the new County of Union at Labatt's Cross Roads. Although the weather was rather unfavorable for a general attendance of the people, still there was a goodly number present on Monday and Tuesday. We found the people were pleased with the idea of having a new county, and we are certainly gratified that the burdens of which they complained have been removed and hope they may never have cause to regret the erection of the new County. For the want of a suitable building the meeting was held in a large gin-house which had been fitted up to answer for the present. After the qualification of the Justices appointed by the last Legislature, they proceeded to the election of officers, who hold their appointments until the next regular election -- the clerks until August two years and the Sheriff until August year. It resulted as follows:
HUGH STEWARD, Clerk, County Court
D. A. COVINGTON, Clerk, Superior Court
JOHN BLOUNT, Coroner
W.M. WILSON, Sheriff
THOS. P. DILLON, Register
JOSHUA HARRIS, Entry Taker
JAMES MARSH, County Surveyor
DARLING BELK, Auctioneer
   The Special Court had not been elected when we left.

D. A. Covington married Susannah Ann Pemelia Gathings (1821-1897) in 1837 and was in Monroe by the 1850 census. In the household at that time: David 40, Susan A. 28, Nancy J. 9, Mary A. 5, Martha W. and Susan S. 3, infant David A. Covington. Value of real estate $10,000. By 1860 personal estate $41,000 – real estate $54,000.

Suncrest Cemetery Monroe
Partial 1886 Letter
from D.A. Covington Jr.

Children: Benjamin C. (1838-1846), Nancy Jane (1841-1859) married Dave Redfern about 1859, Mary Ann (1845-1900) married Dr.Thomas Winchester Bickett (parents of Thomas Walter Bickett), TWINS: Susan Sophia Gathings (1847-1913) married farmer Henry W. Houston and Martha Wall (1847-1923) married Charles Columbus “Lum” Lockhart, David Anderson (1849-1851) married Mary Simmons, Celestia Alice “Lessie” (1852-1889) married Robert Virgil Houston, David Anderson (1853-1898) married Ella Howie (1856-1874) in 1873 and Mary Foote Simmons(1859-1917) in 1878, Baby Girl (1856-56), Theodosia Ernest (1857-58), Baby Boy (1859-59), James Gathings (1860-1902).

U.S. IRS Tax Assessment List – 1866 record for D.A. Covington: one carriage $400 and one piano $200.

Major D.A. Covington was a clerk of the Superior Court of Union County.*

1870 census (after D.A.’s death) recorded: Susan S. 48 (real estate $54,300, personal $20.000), David A. 16 and James G. Covington 9. Also in the household were mother Jane Gathings 69, John Snider 10 and Ann Pressy 9.

The widow of Monroe mayor and Union County state senator D.A. Covington owned substantial tracts between Lancaster Avenue and Church Street, as well as land on Houston Street east of Church Street. (NR)

Of the younger D.A. Covington (1853-1898), attorney, he was partner with Robert B. Redwine - Covington & Redwine and also with H.B. Adams – Covington & Adams. (see partial letter, found rootsweb, an an
cestry.com community.)

1 comment:

  1. Mary, I just found your blog thanks to GeneaBloggers. What a great history resource this is! Best wishes as you continue providing these online resources for history and genealogy researchers.

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